Brexit: 50 things the UK needs to do after triggering Article 50

Brexit officially began Wednesday after UK Prime Minister Theresa May triggered Article 50, kicking off Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union and the painstaking legislative to-do list that comes with it.

One of the next key steps will come when May’s government introduces the Great Repeal Bill.
The bill is designed to put an end to the EU’s legal jurisdiction over the UK. But first it will transpose all current EU laws into the UK statute books “to ensure the maximum stability on exit,” the government says.

Parliament will then begin the daunting task of deciding which EU laws to keep and which to scrap, essentially untangling four decades of EU rules now enshrined in UK legislation.
There are nearly 20,000 EU legislative acts in force that make up a mind-boggling set of rules dictating everything from how much clean energy a country should use to the acceptable curvature of a grocery store banana.

So where will the government begin? Here’s a list of just 50 things the UK will need to work out as it sets sail on its own.

A new immigration system

Immigration was a key issue in the Brexit debate. After the UK withdraws from the union, a system to allow its nationals to visit, work, study and live in the EU — and vice versa — must be hammered out.

The UK is currently part of the European Single Market, which allows goods, services and people to move freely through member states. EU citizens have the right to travel and seek work in other EU countries. Roughly 1.2 million Brits were settled in the EU in 2015, and around 3.2 million EU nationals were living in the UK, according to government statistics.

But as May has made clear, the UK will no longer be part of the single market, so this free movement will come to an end after Brexit.

The idea of a points-based system like Australia’s has been floated, with the aim of attracting immigrants with certain skills to fill gaps in the economy.

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Source By http://edition.cnn.com

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